The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon

I saw a lot of hype on this book and my friend Den recommended it to me so I decided to pick it up. And I have seen a lot of discussion on the possibility of there being a slave/master relationship and it’s a very difficult concept in this book as there’s so much more to it than that, however if you are not a fan of a slave/master relationship be careful with this book, it isn’t exactly that type of thing but certain parts could trigger you.

Paige is a clairvoyant in London, 2059 where it is illegal to be a clairvoyant. She works for the criminal underworld as that’s all she can really do without risk of being caught, though it comes with it’s risks regardless. One day she’s unlucky enough to be on a train with a raid and gets caught. But instead of dying she is taken to Oxford, which has been the home of aliens called Rephaites for 200 years as they’ve been gradually taking more clairvoyants.

This book was super complicated, it felt like I was reading a high fantasy even though it was more sci-fi/dystopian/paranormal, but for all the different jargon and terms I had a hard time remembering what everything was. The world building is incredible an there’s so much in it that it really does feel like it’s own world and not a variance of our own world but it is a bit hard to wrap your head around at times. It did take me about half the book to figure out what the deal was, though I don’t know if that was because I was reading it in Asia or not.

Whilst I remembered the main characters easily enough there were a lot of side characters and I found it really hard to remember who each of them were. Especially once Paige had moved to Oxford.

Whilst there was no romantic relationship between Paige and her owner, Warden, in this novel I could see it being built up which kind of annoyed me because it’s not necessary to always have a relationship just because they’re the main 2 characters. Never mind the fact that their relationship is so complicated, him being her owner after all. But as you go through the novel you find out that things are even more complicated and Warden isn’t exactly like the rest of his kind. This obviously doesn’t nullify the problematicness (is that even a word?) of the relationship being in fiction with the past the world has had with slave and owner relationships. I think it’s up to you where you stand on the issue, I’ve had POC friends find it really offensive and some who have adored it.

I’m scared to jump into the next book because I’m currently not really in the mood to read it but I worry if I leave it too long I’ll forget everything that happened in this book.

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Frostbite by Richelle Mead

I’ll be honest: in writing this post I can’t really remember what I thought of this book so I’ve had to look up other reviews to remind myself as I didn’t even take any notes.

So after what happened in the previous books all the Moroi are on edge as the Strigoi seem to ramping up their efforts to kill them. What else should they do but send all their heirs to a ski trip together, because that makes sense?

Rose and Dmitri’s tension only furthers in this novel as Rose tries to put her attention into another boy and Dmitri, of course, is conflicted about the whole situation. What I have to say is I’m just glad Dmitri was still trying to keep his distance, it shows that he’s aware that he has power over her due to their age gap. Rose generally annoyed me in this context as she really couldn’t wrap her head around Dmitri telling her he’s not comfortable with the age gap.

The ending was super rushed, there was so much waffle of them in the ski resort and then the ending was so sudden and it very much felt like “wait, what? Is that it?”

Lissa was also just super annoying in this book, but when is she not? She seems to only ever have eyes for her boyfriend and fails to notice that some really bad things are happening to Rose. And all the rest of the characters were quite irritating, but not inhuman. They definitely read like the teenagers they were.

All in all I’d say the character development was pretty good in this, and it felt nice to read something from this series that was new to me as the film whilst bad followed the plot pretty well of the first book so it did feel like I’d already read it. I’m actually quite intrigued to see what happens now as I feel like things are going to actually get interesting.

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Vampire Academy by Richelle Mead

I still love to read vampire fiction, if I see a fic rec that has a vampire in it then I’m down. I don’t know why I love vampires so much but I do. So I thought it was about time I read this especially now all the vampire YA hype has died down.

Vampire Academy is about exactly what you think it’s about: a school for vampires. Rose and Lissa are living on the run from the Academy as Lissa believes them remaining at the Academy is keeping Rose in grave danger, but they get dragged back

Yes there is a bit of dodgy romance like you’d expect in a vampire book, but for the most part this book is about the friendship between two girls. I liked the romances in the book, Rose falls for the school’s “bad boy” and we discover he isn’t actually bad and there’s more than meets the eye. Whereas Lissa begins to be attracted to her tutor who is like 10 years older than her but he refuses to let anything happen because of that age gap which makes a nice change. Though I am expecting something to happen between them in further books but hopefully it’ll be when Lissa is older though I won’t hold my breath.

I loved Lissa as a character she was really loyal and wasn’t interested in the politics of her world, she just wants to protect Rose, even though Rose is a bit of a nightmare at times. I’ve seen the film before reading it and I really do not understand how they cast Dimitri because the way he’s described in the book is definitely not how the actor looks.

I found the political world building in this book really interesting, having “good” vampires and bad vampires and people to protect the good vampires because they’re not indestructible, like you find in most vampire novels.

Obviously having watched the film I knew what was going to happen in this book so once I’m finished my library books I’m interested to see what happens with the rest of this series now.

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