Like Water by Rebecca Podos

Thank you to edelweiss and Harper Collins for sending a me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Vanni had always planned to leave her small home town that everyone else gets stuck in, but then her dad get’s diagnosed with Huntington’s, which can be passed to the next generation. So her fear of also being diagnosed stalls her in her plans so she spends her summer working at a water park and flirting around with different people.

So I really liked the exploration of being bisexual in teenagers and whilst the MC does eventually identify as being bi, I really liked that for a while there is a lot of talk of fluidity and a lot of it just kind of happens. Which felt really realistic to me, because it is such a complicated thing to go through. And I liked that it was in a majorly hispanic community as I feel like the majority of novels I’ve read with a bi MC have been very white and it was refreshing to read from another point of view.

As well as there being bisexual representation there is also a character who struggles with their gender identity, and as I am cis myself I didn’t really pick up on it properly until the end, but I think people who themselves have struggled with it would pick up on it much earlier. When I realised it was very much like “oh yeah of course”. I tried to hunt to see if any genderqueer people had reviewed it on goodreads but came up blank, and obviously I’m not going to ask people what they identify as for sake of a review. But yeah I’m cis so I can’t say if the rep is good but it felt good.

As with the genderqueer rep, I don’t have Huntington’s so I couldn’t tell you if it deals with that well but I really appreciated that it was part of the novel. It’s not a well talked about disease and it’s not as famous as things like MS.

I think the one thing that made this read not a favourite was just that I didn’t find any of the characters particularly likeable. And when I say that I don’t mean like they were all awful people and I hated reading them. They’re well developed characters and have their own driving forces. I just got annoyed with them a lot, but hey teenagers can be pretty annoying so they definitely felt realistic.

I think if you’re looking for a diverse summer contemporary with a wide range of issues this is the book for you.

Book Depository

Follow me:

Twitter
Goodreads
Instagram

 

Advertisements

Cyclone series by Courtney Milan

235665061

Trade Me

So this has fake relationship in it and talks about what it is to be privileged. It also discusses addiction, eating disorders and stress.

Our MC is a Chinese American girl with a background of human rights issues in China as her parents fleed China to get way from incarceration which is true for many Chinese people who immigrated to America and the like. She deals with a lot of poverty and I really loved reading that because hey it’s good to read that in novels its good not to have the perfect life for the MC, obviously it’s not good that the character is in that position but it’s life. She made most of her decisions based on her background and the poverty she was in.

A character in this novel deals with a restrictive eating disorder and as I was super close to developing one a few years ago this was really important to me to read as it’s one of the lesser known EDs. But of course I’m going to say that if you have an ED trigger be careful with this book.

 

24348034

Hold Me

First things first, this book has a trans girl MC, which is few and far between in any genre, especially in romance. As well as that it has the hate to love trope which I always adore.

Now I can’t say whether it was accurate trans rep and I tried to see if I could find some reviews by the trans reviewing community but couldn’t find any, if you have written one or aware of any please let me know!

He’s Chinese Thai with a buddhist parent and Muslim parent and he’s bi and that isn’t glossed over he talks about past affairs with both men and women. She’s latinx and into science which you know I love my STEM girls as one myself.

Some people didn’t like how childish the main characters were with each other in the beginning but I loved it and found it hilarious. And if you’re really up for some diverse romance I recommend both novels in this series. You don’t need to read Trade Me first if you’re more interested in this one but it sets the scene.

Follow me:

Twitter
Goodreads
Instagram

Cheer by Mia Archer

Cheer follows a girl, Alex, as she realises that she might not be straight. She decides to join her best friend in becoming a cheerleader and falls for her but all the while another girl in her grade has it out for her as she seems to think that Alex is after her boyfriend. TW: slut shaming, casual homophobia, casual ableism.

I got this on a whim from a bookbub email so I honestly hadnt planned to read it any time soon. But then I got into a romance kick and I wanted to read a wlw relationship so this one was the one I spotted in my kindle library so went with it not expecting much.

I was pleasantly surprised though. Yes the writing could use some work and it’s your classic WLW romance in that a person comes out in the process of the story but it was honestly just super cute at times.

I loved reading the parts where the MC was struggling over her feelings towards a woman because I’ve been there I know what it’s like trying to convince yourself that you’re not feeling that way for someone of the same gender because sadly some people still find it taboo and thought things aren’t as bad as they used to be it’s still a possible struggle.

There were random moments where feminist ideas were brought in about both sexuality and gender and it was so good to read in a YA novel. I say this every time I read a YA novel with feminist parts but it just makes me happy to think of teenagers growing up in a world where feminism is more “mainstream” as it wasn’t when I was a teen and I was so misinformed and it was awful.

I might get around to reading more of Archer’s books as she’s now on my radar and honestly I love wlw stories and I can’t get enough of soft girls.

Follow me:

Twitter
Goodreads
Instagram

Cyberlove Series by Megan Erickson and Santino Hassell

Ok so you need to read this series. If you like gay romance this is for you. If you’re new to my blog you should be made aware that I love when books involve technology and the internet so this series is perfect for me. Strong Signal features a twitch streamer, Fast Connection has grindr, Hard Wired involved conventions and Mature Content is about youtubers.

28561501

Strong Signal

This is the first book of the series and isn’t the best but I think that’s because Megtino hadn’t quite got into their stride yet, however that doesn’t mean it’s not good. It’s still damn good.

This book has anxiety rep, Kai who is the twitch streamer and one of the main characters has really bad anxiety. He has anxiety to the point where he doesn’t really go outside of his apartment and for me I found this so important as whilst I do go outside and go to uni, there are days where I really feel like it would just be so much easier to just stay in bed. And it was also just really good to see someone in a book with anxiety doing something like streaming whilst not being able to go out because so often people don’t understand the idea of having anxiety but being able to do stuff online. It shows you the idea of safe spaces and I just loved reading it. I loved reading something like anxiety in an erotic romance novel.

30415154

Fast Connection

Fast connection features grindr and I’m all about the de-stigmatising of dating apps. As someone who uses Tinder and OK Cupid I’m so glad that it’s so much more common now because it means there’s more people on the apps and it means people don’t think you’re “sad” for going on them. So I love reading books that feature dating apps because it means more and more people find it normal.

If you like age gaps this book is definitely for you because our 2 MCs have a ~15 year age gap or something like that. Luke has kids and one of them is the same age as Dominic’s sister and it brings some interesting and funny situations.

33642764

Hard Wired

Hard Wired features some characters we meet in the first 2 books who are the moderators on Kai’s twitch channel. They go to a convention and hook up but then some secrets get in the way. I’m a bit funny about books that feature miscommunication but I enjoyed this one, though at times I did find the characters just really irritating. However the characters deal with a lot of their own personal struggles, which again I loved reading in a romance novel.

Jesse, our main character who is a surfer living in California realises he’s not straight in this novel and I felt like it was dealt with really well. The little bits of discussion of sexuality being fluid and how it’s ok to realise you’re not straight later on in life were something I just enjoyed reading because so often it’s just expected that once you’re past adolescence you should know exactly who you are and what you’re into, which is more often than not not the case.

34934798

Mature Content

Mature Content is my favourite of the series and I’m really excited to read the next book whatever it is because I feel like Megtino are really hitting their stride. I really loved the hate to love trope in this. I loved the drama of fighting youtubers. It kind of felt like a bit of a call out to certain youtubers at times which made me laugh a lot.

At times this book felt less heavy than the previous books but then you get hit with the characters being super self diminishing and it was so relatable. The pair definitely have more ups and downs than the others which I think was really good because otherwise I think Beau could’ve been a bit boring but bringing Zane into his life made him fun to read.

Follow me:

Twitter
Goodreads
Instagram

They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera

Thank you to edelweiss and Harper Collins for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

After reading History is All You Left Me this was one of my most anticipated reads. Knowing that Adam had been working on this for such a long time as well had me super hyped up.

Obviously the title itself is a huge spoiler so you can’t hate me for talking about the characters dying, and if you have triggers to do with death, violence and suicide do not read this. Now I’m one of those heathens who sometimes reads the final page of a book so this didn’t really bother me, though I felt like I actually read a bit too fast at times because I was so desperate to know how they died. So I might reread this book soon and change my feelings about it because I was definitely aware of reading things a bit faster than I normally would out of sheer impatience.

I actually feel like my enjoyment of this book was a little bit diminished because it was just so unfair that the characters had to die because you got to learn about their lives and how bad a hand they’d been dealt and knowing they were going to die just left me feeling kind of hollow because of how unfair it was. As someone who has grown up dealing with the loss of young relations things like this really effect me.

I don’t know the technical term for it, but Mateo has anxiety that manifests itself in a kind of agoraphobia and Adam wrote it so well, even though I don’t experience these feelings, sometimes I do have times where I feel close to it and I related to it a lot.

Like in The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon you get snippets of other people’s lives  as they are involved in the lives of Mateo and Rufus and I loved getting to see that and see how the Death Cast would effect people and how they tried to set the world to rights.

The idea of the book and living in a world where you get phoned the day of our death is really interesting to me and I think is actually a really good discussion piece for teenagers and adults alike. Would you want to know if you were going to die that day? Would you rather just live your life without the presence of that knowledge in the back of your head?

Book Depository

Follow me:

Twitter
Goodreads
Instagram

Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde

Aw this book is honestly so sweet. It was one of the books I was super excited for this year and it did not let me down.

It surrounds a convention for all the youtubers and geeky types like us lot where a group of friends travel from Australia to LA for the weekend of their dreams.

The book is pretty short and whilst I really liked my time with the book I felt like there isn’t much for me to say.

This could’ve easily been a 5 star read for me as the style was so easy to read and the representation was on point. There was Asian Rep, aspie rep, anxiety Rep, chubby Rep, bisexual Rep, lesbian Rep. However I felt like there was just something a little lacking and it’s not something I could ever pin point but it just wasn’t quite in the favourites position for me

The book follows 2 blossoming relationships and it was honestly just really sweet to read. There was little miscommunications and classic tropes from YA romance that just makes you squeal with delight.

Even though my review is a bit thin on the ground I do hope you read this book because it just made me really happy when I read it and I can’t wait to read the next Jen Wilde book because I feel like it’s going to be a 5 star.

Book Depository

Follow me:

Twitter
Goodreads
Instagram

The Queen of Dauphine Street by Thea De Salle

So this book follows side characters from The King of Bourbon Street, like most romance series seem to do. Maddy is crazy rich, richer than you could imagine but she has a messy past. Darren is a typical Texas boy and is best friends with Maddy’s exes brother but an ex makes an attempt on his life and Maddy is there to save the day and take him away to New Orleans on her boat to protect him.

Whilst I loved Maddy this book did feel like a bit of a downgrade from the first book. But maybe I just loved Sol and Rain so much that anything would feel like that.

It did kind of feel a bit off the wall at times for honest. It was fun but because it’s based around Maddy who leads a ridiculous life things would happen that just don’t actually happen so though this is a contemporary you have to suspend your belief at times.

A lot of this book takes place in New Orleans, of course, so it made me really happy to read about Sol and Rain as their relationship was a little bit further on in time.

The most important thing for me in this book was Maddy. Though she was a bit wacky she was so unapologetic in her sexuality. She was bi, and she never hid it. Whenever speaking about past experiences she never glossed over her sleeping with men and women and she didn’t downplay it. And though I am not bi, pan and bi kind of go along in the same boat in terms of representation in media or lack thereof. So Maddy was a really important character for me.

There are possible triggers in this book for stalking and guns so if that’s something that could set you off be careful with this book.

Follow me:

Twitter
Goodreads
Instagram

Tash Hearts Tolstoy by Kathryn Ormsbee

Thank you to edelweiss and for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

If this book isn’t on your TBR now add it because it’s so adorable and funny.

Tash (pronounced Tosh) is in love with Leo Tolstoy, the dead author. She makes a web series based on Anna Karenina with her friends playing the roles and sees little buzz until one day a big youtuber posts about the series and they receive instant online fame.

So Tosh comes to the realisation throughout the book that she is asexual, now I’m not ace so I can’t tell you if the representation is good and not problematic but it felt like it was. It felt accurate to what I know about asexuality from my friends and the experiences they’ve had. If you are ace and have read this book and think it isn’t accurate please let me know.  I would also say that there is a warning for aphobia from other characters.

I really loved the parts of this book which focussed on the web series. It reminded me of the time when I binge watched the Lizzie Bennet Diaries and how much I loved them. It made me want to read Anna Karenina so I bought a copy, I probably won’t read it for a long time but I own it now.

I loved Tosh I found her so relateable, her anxieties read so well and were completely accessible to me despite having different anxieties. I loved that she was vegetarian, I never read books with veggie MCs, and so many people these days are veggie or vegan that it was just really nice to read. She was also Buddhist which is another thing that doesn’t feature in books much.

Something I really loved was that you get to read about youtube creators in a way that felt real, a lot of the time you read a book with youtubers in it and there is no mention of the amount of work that does into it but this book spoke about that a lot. It spoke about the stress of constant creation and relying on people to be there when you need them to be and also how hard it is to be in the limelight.

I loved that the MC ended up in a relationship with someone who was happy to be with her, there wasn’t any weird feelings from his side about her being ace, he didn’t try to pressure her. He liked her for her.

There was some really good side character representation as well which I absolutely adored.

I hope more people read this book because I haven’t seen much hype about it but it’s so worth the read.

Book Depository

Follow me:

Twitter
Goodreads
Instagram

The King of Bourbon Street by Thea de Salle

Arianna Barrington needs to get away from her mother after a sex tape leaks of her, so she flies with her brother to New Orleans where she meets Sol DuMont, hotel mogul. Sol is still getting over the loss of his dad, the breakdown of his marriage and his complete lack of interest in life. The pair instantly click and begin a wild affair.

As a chubby girl this book meant so much to me. The MC is fat and I’ve read a fair few romance books in my life but this was such a breath of fresh air and it didn’t make me feel like an absolute mess who could never get a man because I’m not thin enough. And to add to that the love interest is a bi male, and it’s not just like a stated fact either, he references his past relationships with men and flirts with other guys a lot. You don’t read a lot of bi men in books. I think the biggest thing that I loved was just how casual everything was, from Arianna’s weight to Sol’s sexuality. Arianna is fat and it’s not made out to be a bad thing, it’s not made out that she’s beautiful despite being fat. She’s beautiful and she’s fat, it felt quite empowering for me to read.

Now there was insta-love in this, however when you’re reading it you kind of forget about the concept of time and just fall so into the story and Rain and Sol’s relationship. There was a couple of times where I did roll my eyes at how fast they seemed to be moving but the characters themselves were aware of how fast their lives were moving and weren’t acting like what they had was normal.

Any book is better if it includes dogs and this was extra good because it has a corgi and corgis are some of the cutest funniest dogs out there. Corgis are high up on my list of dogs I want to own so reading this made me so happy whenever there was a scene with the dog.

There is an age gap in this book, and if that makes you uncomfortable don’t read it. However consent is very important, and Sol is very aware how much more experience he has compared to Rain and tries very hard to make sure that he isn’t don’t anything to lead her into something she might not be into.

Follow me:

Twitter
Goodreads
Instagram

History is All You Left Me by Adam Silvera

I’ve had Adam Silvera on my TBR for a while now and just never got around to reading anything. But then I saw History in the airport on my way to Italy so I just though I would get it, especially since the only other physical book I took with me was SOC. Like all of my reviews, but specifically the ones which have sensitive topics, if I say something wrong or offensive let me know please.

Griffin’s first love has died in a tragic accident and Griffin has to navigate the world without Theo in it suddenly. On top of that Theo’s new boyfriend is constantly trying to make friends with Griffin when all he wants to do is hate him, since he was the new boyfriend.

I’ll be honest and say I haven’t read much books involving gay male teens written by gay male writers. For some reason all the kind of popular gay books are written by women, which is another discussion for another day about sexualisation of gay guys. It was refreshing to read something like this, where it was just about these kids trying to live their lives after such a bad experience.

Theo was honestly really annoying. He thought OCD was a “cute quirk” and he moved on immediately to some guy who looked exactly like his ex. And then jerked his new boyfriend about because he still liked said ex, which just made me very uncomfortable.

Something I really liked about this book, well not necessarily liked, was that it had a good representation of grief. How people do silly things when they’re grieving. It showed the different reactions people go through which I thought was done really well, a lot of books just show a person being sad and miss out on the whole slew of emotions that a person will go through. There was a couple of twists because of the grief all the characters go through that really had me quite shocked, and that takes a lot.

To add to that it also had good representation of OCD. I don’t know if Silvera has OCD, I don’t know his life, but if he didn’t it still felt real. There was some stereotypes and some lesser known OCD related habits. I could tell that he’d done his research into it.

At the moment I have this book as on my faves shelf on goodreads, but I’m not really sure about it. Like I really loved it but I feel like it wasn’t quite up there with other books I’ve read recently. I don’t know.

Book Depository

Follow me:

Twitter
Goodreads
Instagram